How to Maintain Energy Efficiency

If you are a new convert to energy efficient living, you should start with an energy audit. This way you know exactly where your energy is being wasted and how you can make it more efficient. Then you have to maintain energy efficiency.

If you don’t change air filters, leave lights on because they are LEDs, or haven’t upgraded your thermostat to a programmable one, you are not really saving much. Fortunately there are some very basic ways that you can boost your home’s energy efficiency.

Open Up Your Windows – Harness Sunlight (or Block It)

Your windows are a huge source of energy savings and waste. You can use the sun to your advantage in the summers by opening up your blinds and using natural light to brighten up your interiors while the sun is out.

By the same token, direct sunlight through windows that are not well insulated could be making your air conditioning work overtime. Use curtains and drapes to temper direct sunlight if you don’t have insulated windows; same thing in the winter to keep cold drafts out to save on heating bills.

Of course, in concert with natural light, you should have already switched from incandescent and halogen bulbs to LEDs. If you haven’t, you should do so now. LEDs last 10 times longer than traditional bulbs and can save you close to a hundred dollars a year by just replacing your most used light bulbs.

Turn Down the HVAC

For every degree you turn your HVAC down, you knock 1% of off your annual heating and cooling bill. Your HVAC system is by far the biggest energy draw in your home. If you take time to adjust your thermostat down when you are away and when you go to sleep, it can take around 10% off of your heating and cooling costs in a year.

One way to do that is to invest in a programmable thermostat. That way you can set it to turn on and off or go up and down on a timer. This one simple change can add up to close to $200 in savings per year.

You can double your savings by taking advantage of mild and balmy days by turning your HVAC off completely, opening windows, and letting your ceiling fans do the work. They use a lot less energy than your A/C unit and can be extremely effective at slashing your energy bills in spring and fall.

Plug Holes and Cracks

A lot of energy efficiency is lost through cracks and holes throughout your house. There could be a crack in your window sill, holes around your hanging lights, and drafts coming from your attic.

Go to any hardware store for a caulk gun and some caulk. Then seal any leaks, holes, and cracks that you find inside and outside of your house to maintain energy efficiency. It can save you over $200 per year for this change alone.

Have Your HVAC Unit Inspected

Having your HVAC inspected and tuned up at least once a year can add up to more than $400 in savings over the year. Don’t attempt to do this yourself. Professionals are trained to fine tune your system motors, your gas connections, and voltage among other things to find leaks and energy waste.

Change Your Filters

Just like direct sunlight beaming into your living room can tax your air conditioning, clogged and dirty air filters will block cool and heated air, also making your HVAC systems work overtime. By simply changing your filters every three months and cleaning them at least once a month, you will not only reduce your utility bills, but your indoor air will be much cleaner.

Remember to Conserve

Finally a note of caution; a recent study shows that most people use more energy because they have converted to energy efficient bulbs. One survey put the number at nearly 60% of people who are getting higher energy bills despite having gone EE. The problem is that too many are forgetting to conserve energy.

Instead, because LEDs last longer and use less energy, many people are using them more, which of course, is resulting in bigger bills. Remember when maintaining energy efficiency that you also have to remember to conserve energy as well.